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Viewing entries tagged with 'inclusion'

Turning inclusion inside out

Posted by Philip on 14 June 2017, 6:46 pm in , , , , ,

Inclusion. Such a buzzword of our time. But, as I've written before, inclusion is but a whisper away from assimilation and colonisation. Currently, inclusion asks, "How can we include others in the mainstream? But, what if we asked, "How can we include the mainstream in others?" instead?

One of my clients, Be. Accessible, is achieving this inside-out version of inclusion admirably by referring to disabled people as access citizens and pointing out that, at some time in our lives (whether due to ageing, temporary or permanent injury or illness), everyone will be an access citizen. This disrupts the conversation about one in four people having 'special' needs (them) and the rest (us). It reframes the conversation — we're all in the same boat in regards to needing spaces and places to be accessible. This framing invites the mainstream into the access community.

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What does true diversity look like?

Posted on 26 April 2016, 10:43 am in , , , , , , , ,

Updated 7.45pm 26 April 2016: I have corrected the "assimilated" part of diagram. I also found out the original diagram is not Susie Sirman's (source unknown). 

The following tweet turned up in my feed this morning from Susie Sirman, from Alberta, Canada, a self-confessed "high school science and art teacher, learning coach, edtech enthusiast, busy mom and a terrible choice to follow on Twitter." So I followed her. But anyway, her tweet:

I like the model (further tweets between us revealed it isn't hers) and I agree with it to an extent. Simply putting different people in the same room isn't useful, but I think it is, unfortunately, what inclusion is about currently. It isn't, however, diversity.

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From diversity to inclusion

Posted by Philip on 16 June 2015, 7:41 am in , , , , , ,

Update:
View slides on SlideShare »

The question of diversity and inclusion in schools is by no means a new one. Some do it well, some refuse and most, I would say, are just not sure where to start.

Preparing a keynote for Auckland Careers and Transition Educators –whose "main focus is on the career education of youth and their transition into the wider world of employment, training and/or further education", I began by reflecting on the question, "Can we get straight from diversity to inclusion?" It occurred to me that, no, we can't.

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